Simple Recovery's Blog

Monday, October 16, 2017

Nutritional Knowledge Everyone In Recovery Needs

Nutritional Knowledge Everyone In Recovery Needs


Nutritional Knowledge Everyone In Recovery Needs
Malnutrition can be a common ailment in most people that have an addiction. Drugs and alcohol can suppress an addict’s appetite. Foods rich in nutrients are necessary for proper body function and addiction tends to desolate the body’s ability to absorb those essential nutrients. Determining the type of malnutrition that takes place in the body, depends on what the addiction is for.



Deficiencies
  • Opiates
    • B6
    • Calcium
    • Iron
    • Vitamin D
  • Cocaine
    • Omega-3
  • Alcohol
    • B6
    • Folic Acid
    • Thiamine

Alcohol also tremendously affects major organs that involve nutrition and metabolism. The liver, which removes toxins, and the pancreas, which absorbs fats and regulates sugars, can be thrown off which results in a disproportion of electrolytes, fluids, and proteins.  Some damage of the body may be beyond repair, but proper nutrition can be instrumental in restoring function to tissues and organs, including the brain.

The benefits to eating healthy can make an addict feel better, adjust their attitude, or improve their body image. Providing the body with the nutrients it needs is the goal of healthy eating. There are two categories of nutrients called macronutrients and micronutrients. Macronutrients account for carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and water which the body thrives on. Micronutrients  are essential in small amounts that include vitamins and minerals.

Macronutrients

Carbohydrates
  • Provides the body with glucose. When glucose is converted to energy it maintains bodily functions and supports physical activity.
  • Healthy resources
    • Beans
    • Low-fat dairy
    • Nuts
    • Potatoes
    • Fruits
    • Vegetables
    • Whole grains
      • bread
      • cereal
Fiber
  • Type of carbohydrate that is not responsible for fueling the body with energy. Fiber regulates blood sugar and helps lowers cholesterol.
    • Soluble
      • Dissolves in water to absorb into other parts of the body.
      • Loosen stools to prevent constipation.
    • Insoluble
      • Does not dissolve in water. Aids in moving food through the digestive system.
      • Bulks stools to prevent diarrhea.

  • Healthy resources
    • Apples
    • Beans
    • Brown rice
    • Carrots
    • Nuts
    • Oatmeal
    • Tomatoes
    • Wheat bread


Protein
  • Proteins are considered the building blocks of life due to amino acids which are ingested through proteins. Weight loss, growth and development, the repair of cells, creation of new cells, and regulation of hormones associated with mood are all regulated through the protein’s amino acids. Proteins also boost the immune system which could be weakened by addiction.
  • Healthy resources
    • Beans
    • Eggs
    • Fish
    • Lean Beef
    • Low-fat Dairy
    • Lean Poultry
    • Nuts


Fat
  • Healthy fats help provide energy, have protective effects for cardiovascular disease, and help absorb vitamins.

  • Healthy resources
    • Dairy
    • Fish
    • Nuts
    • Omega-3
    • Seeds

Water
  • Essential for body function since the body is composed of 70% water including the most of the blood composition and cells.

  • Healthy hydration resources
    • Cucumber
    • Low-fat Milk
    • Soups
    • Low-sugar sports drinks
    • Strawberries
    • Water
    • Watermelon

Micronutrients

Minerals and Vitamins
  • Eating a balanced meal keeps the body functioning normally and healthy with the help of vitamins and minerals.

  • Healthy Resources
    • Beans
    • Dairy
    • Fruits
    • Peas
    • Peanuts
    • Seeds
    • Vegetables
    • Whole grains
      • cereal
      • bread

Learning to have a healthy diet is knowledge everyone in recovery should have. Recovery is treating the body, mind, and spirit. The body can be treated by eating healthy and replenishing a body that was once afflicted with addiction.

The answer to recovery is Simple. Simple Recovery has a passion for transforming lives through residential, intensive outpatient, and outpatient programs. Built on action, our treatment plan encourages movement in life, bringing clients back to work, back to school, or involvement with meaningful volunteer work. For information on our addiction treatment and dual diagnosis programs for men and women, call: 877-312-7440

Friday, October 13, 2017

What is an Attachment Pattern?

What is an Attachment Pattern?

What is an Attachment Pattern?
An attachment patterns emerges in response to caregiving in childhood. There are 4 primary attachment patterns. They are ways of thinking and behavioral strategies in order to feel safe and to receive care and protection from adults in their family. Recognizing our attachment pattern can give us insight into the relationships we choose, our strengths and vulnerabilities in relationships.

Our attachment patterns emerge in childhood and develop throughout adulthood. It influences how we go about getting our needs meet. We often find partners that confirm our ideas about how relationships are supposed to be.

The 4 primary attachment patterns are secure attachment, avoidant dismissive attachment, anxious preoccupied attachment, and fearful avoidant attachment. Each type of attachment pattern has common themes and characteristics.

Securely attached adults tend to be more satisfied with their relationships. They allow their partner to move freely while feeling confident in the attachment. These relationships demonstrate honest, independent connection.  In children, you see that they see their parent as a secure base to venture out from.

The person with avoidant dismissive attachment distances themselves from others. They may lean toward isolation and feel independent. They detach easily from loved ones and tend to deny the importance of connection. They can shut down emotionally with ease. In childhood, they likely felt it was safer to be self-reliant and to keep their feelings and needs to themselves growing up with a parent who was emotionally unavailable.

Anxious preoccupied attachment looks different. Individuals with this attachment often look to their partners to complete them or rescue them. They seek safety, yet they take actions that push their partner away. They may be clingy, demanding, or possessive. They may act insecure and desperate. They may feel extreme jealousy, for example, when their partner wants to spend time with friends.

The fearful avoidant attachment is characterized by running away. These individuals attempt to run away from their feelings. They often feel overwhelmed by their reactions and tend to have unpredictable moods. They tend to believe you will get hurt by being close to others while realizing you need to be close. They have no organized strategy for having their needs met. A person with fearful avoidant attachment may end up in an abusive relationship. They also may re-live trauma from their childhood throughout their adult years.

The good news is your attachment pattern can evolve. You childhood attachment pattern doesn’t have to define your pattern for the rest of your life. With support, you can create a secure attachment pattern regardless of the childhood your experienced.

At Simple Recovery, we maintain a simple goal for our residents: learn how to live sober. Our multi-phase program is structured to rebuild life for each resident through clinical therapy, holistic recovery, and integration to either school, work, or volunteering. For information on our programs of treatment for addiction and dual diagnosis, call us today: 855-402-5617

Understanding the Mind-Body Connection in Addiction and Recovery

Understanding the Mind-Body Connection in Addiction and Recovery


Understanding the Mind-Body Connection in Addiction and Recovery
Health can be directly affected by the mind-body connection. Research continues to find that imbalances that may relate to the body could be contributed from the mental state and thought process in the mind and vice versa. The mind and body share a distinct chemical language that constantly communicates with each other.

Hormones and neurotransmitters are messengers that link the endocrine system and the nervous system to the mind and the body through their chemical language. The cardiovascular system and digestive tract prepare emotions that move through neurological pathways that attach to the brain. Stressors in life can produce physical ailments brought about by life-changing events and emotions. Experiencing butterflies in the stomach, mouthwatering when thinking of delicious food, or a pounding heart when nervous are examples of bridging the mind and the body.

Mind-body connection is certainly not a new concept. In Western medicine, the mind and the body have been viewed as separate entities. In recent years there has been an evolution to compile an impressive amount of information to reconnect the mind and they body together.

There are several techniques that are used to produce a positive influence on the body while enhancing the mind. Behavioral, psychological, and spiritual concepts commence together in mind-body therapies.

Meditation
Get centered in meditation by using breathing practices and restoring balance of the mind and the body. The body will rest while the mind is awake with quiet thoughts in peace of the present moment.

Yoga
Poses in yoga work to calm the brain. Yoga postures can stimulate organs which supply fresh blood to the brain. The brain then becomes active and sharp along with being tranquil.

Acupuncture
The needles are placed in specific places on the body depending on the stress or the pain. Once the needles are pushed through the skin, the emotional or physical pain that was once stored can be released, often causing crying because acupuncture can help get a person in touch with their feelings.

Cognitive Behavior therapy (CBT)
Using cognitive behavior therapy for the mind-body connection has shown to be effective. By thinking differently about the physical pain, CBT can lead to less pain after the treatment.

Guided Imagery
A form of hypnosis that directs concentration onto images held in the mind. Guided imagery therapy uses the connection between the brain and the involuntary nervous system to activate the visual cortex without direct input into the eyes. This therapy affects the emotional capacity to make physical changes that can help to ease any stress-related health concerns.

Biofeedback
Electronic monitoring of normal body functions can help train someone to take control of a function that they may have problems with. The mind trains the biological system to learn dexterity to control functions such as blood pressure, brain activity, and bowel movements. Somebody with migraines, for example, can see the functionality of their brain on a monitor and learn to elude migraines through biofeedback. By increasing the blood flow through their hands, they can then divert excess blood from their head that can curb the pain of the headache.

Recognizing the mind-body connection can benefit the health of individuals, including addicts. Employing both psychological and physical therapy methods to help with addiction and recovery can better bring about emotional balance. Understanding how to connect the mind and the body during addiction and recovery can be useful for long-term sobriety.


The answer to recovery is Simple. Simple Recovery has a passion for transforming lives through residential, intensive outpatient, and outpatient programs. Built on action, our treatment plan encourages movement in life, bringing clients back to work, back to school, or involvement with meaningful volunteer work. For information on our addiction treatment and dual diagnosis programs for men and women, call: 877-312-7440

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