Simple Recovery's Blog

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

What Does Self-Respect Mean?

What Does Self-Respect Mean?


What Does Self-Respect Mean?
When you suffer from addiction, you may have no idea what self-respect is.  A person who is addicted to a particular substance will do anything to get it.  Lying, cheating, and stealing all come with the disease.  For those who are in severe stages, addiction usually causes them to do humiliating and degrading things, just to get more drugs or alcohol.  A true lack of self-respect develops.  You do things that you wouldn’t normally do in a sound state of mind.  Doing these things perpetuates a cycle.  When your addiction forces you to do degrading things, it’s shameful.  You may want those harsh feelings to subside so you use more.  By the time a person has reached recovery, they have likely lost all respect for themselves.  

Self-respect is defined as being confident and behaving with honor and dignity.  On the contrary, an addict or alcoholic may behave in a conceited manner and their actions are not honorary.  Most newcomers have been behaving this way for so long that they need a true lesson in humility when beginning recovery.  Humility is the perfect balance of having self-respect and a modest opinion of yourself.  Someone who is humble likes to help others in need and be of service where needed.  Yet, their self-respect prevents them from being taken advantage of.  They are kind but still consider themselves valuable.

Many people who suffer from addiction have low self-esteem.  Typically, low self-esteem and lack of self-respect go hand-in-hand. When a person possesses low self-esteem, they think they are undeserving so they let people walk all over them.  When you don’t respect yourself, it’s impossible to respect others and others to respect you.  This is why, if you’re new to recovery, you should spend a large amount of time getting to know yourself.  Overcoming addiction alone is a fantastic accomplishment!  There are many people who haven’t been so lucky.  Now that you have received the gift, learning to value yourself and who you’ve become is important.  When you’re proud of what you’ve done, it makes you want to do more.  Practice humility and kindness towards others and you will learn to respect yourself.
The answer to recovery is Simple. Simple Recovery has a passion for transforming lives through residential, intensive outpatient, and outpatient programs. Built on action, our treatment plan encourages movement in life, bringing clients back to work, back to school, or involvement with meaningful volunteer work. For information on our addiction treatment and dual diagnosis programs for men and women, call: 877-312-7440

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Symptoms of Withdrawal

Symptoms of Withdrawal

Symptoms of Withdrawal
Withdrawal is defined by Merriam-Webster as the syndrome of often painful physical and psychological symptoms that follow discontinuance of an addicting drug. When the human body is used to having alcohol or drugs, it responds with withdrawal symptoms when the drugs or alcohol are reduced or stopped. You can experience withdrawal from alcohol, illegal drugs, or prescription medicines.
Alcohol withdrawal symptoms can begin as early as 4 hours after cutting down or stopping and begin as late as a few days after the last drink. They can range from mild to life-threatening. The severity depends on the level of dependence and your body physiology.
Mild withdrawal symptoms may include:
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Sweating
  • Shakiness
  • Intense worry or anxiety
  • Feeling tense or edgy
  • Insomnia
Severe withdrawal symptoms may include:
  • Feeling things on your body that are not there
  • Seeing things on your body that are not there
  • Being extremely confused, jumpy, or upset
  • Seizures
Withdrawal from prescription medicines or illegal drugs vary based on the specific drug or combination of drugs. Physical withdrawal symptoms can last from one week to one month. Common symptoms include:
  • Abdominal pain
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Extreme sweating
  • Nervousness and shaking
  • Seizures
  • Death
The first stage of withdrawal is called the acute phase. Every drug and every person is different, causing symptoms and severity to vary.
The next stage of withdrawal is called the Post-Acute Withdrawal Syndrome. This phase isn’t talked about as often, which is problematic. As your brain chemistry returns to homeostasis it causes post-acute withdrawal symptoms. These symptoms can seem disruptive and disappointing when people don't know what's happening. During this stage you may have no physical withdrawal symptoms. In this stage psychological withdrawal symptoms are dominant. They may include:

  • Insomnia
  • Anxiety
  • Irritability
  • Mood swings
  • Low enthusiasm
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Tiredness
  • Depression
  • Loss of interest in sex
  • Trouble with memory
If you are physically dependent on alcohol or drugs and are experiencing symptoms of withdrawal, you may need the aid of medical professionals to help you safely detox. Withdrawal can be life threatening and can be dangerous. If you have already gone through the physical detox you will still benefit from the professional support of a treatment program. The post-acute withdrawal symptoms can last up to two years. You don’t have to do it alone.
The answer to recovery is Simple. Simple Recovery has a passion for transforming lives through residential, intensive outpatient, and outpatient programs. Built on action, our treatment plan encourages movement in life, bringing clients back to work, back to school, or involvement with meaningful volunteer work. For information on our addiction treatment and dual diagnosis programs for men and women, call: 877-312-7440

Monday, October 16, 2017

Nutritional Knowledge Everyone In Recovery Needs

Nutritional Knowledge Everyone In Recovery Needs


Nutritional Knowledge Everyone In Recovery Needs
Malnutrition can be a common ailment in most people that have an addiction. Drugs and alcohol can suppress an addict’s appetite. Foods rich in nutrients are necessary for proper body function and addiction tends to desolate the body’s ability to absorb those essential nutrients. Determining the type of malnutrition that takes place in the body, depends on what the addiction is for.



Deficiencies
  • Opiates
    • B6
    • Calcium
    • Iron
    • Vitamin D
  • Cocaine
    • Omega-3
  • Alcohol
    • B6
    • Folic Acid
    • Thiamine

Alcohol also tremendously affects major organs that involve nutrition and metabolism. The liver, which removes toxins, and the pancreas, which absorbs fats and regulates sugars, can be thrown off which results in a disproportion of electrolytes, fluids, and proteins.  Some damage of the body may be beyond repair, but proper nutrition can be instrumental in restoring function to tissues and organs, including the brain.

The benefits to eating healthy can make an addict feel better, adjust their attitude, or improve their body image. Providing the body with the nutrients it needs is the goal of healthy eating. There are two categories of nutrients called macronutrients and micronutrients. Macronutrients account for carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and water which the body thrives on. Micronutrients  are essential in small amounts that include vitamins and minerals.

Macronutrients

Carbohydrates
  • Provides the body with glucose. When glucose is converted to energy it maintains bodily functions and supports physical activity.
  • Healthy resources
    • Beans
    • Low-fat dairy
    • Nuts
    • Potatoes
    • Fruits
    • Vegetables
    • Whole grains
      • bread
      • cereal
Fiber
  • Type of carbohydrate that is not responsible for fueling the body with energy. Fiber regulates blood sugar and helps lowers cholesterol.
    • Soluble
      • Dissolves in water to absorb into other parts of the body.
      • Loosen stools to prevent constipation.
    • Insoluble
      • Does not dissolve in water. Aids in moving food through the digestive system.
      • Bulks stools to prevent diarrhea.

  • Healthy resources
    • Apples
    • Beans
    • Brown rice
    • Carrots
    • Nuts
    • Oatmeal
    • Tomatoes
    • Wheat bread


Protein
  • Proteins are considered the building blocks of life due to amino acids which are ingested through proteins. Weight loss, growth and development, the repair of cells, creation of new cells, and regulation of hormones associated with mood are all regulated through the protein’s amino acids. Proteins also boost the immune system which could be weakened by addiction.
  • Healthy resources
    • Beans
    • Eggs
    • Fish
    • Lean Beef
    • Low-fat Dairy
    • Lean Poultry
    • Nuts


Fat
  • Healthy fats help provide energy, have protective effects for cardiovascular disease, and help absorb vitamins.

  • Healthy resources
    • Dairy
    • Fish
    • Nuts
    • Omega-3
    • Seeds

Water
  • Essential for body function since the body is composed of 70% water including the most of the blood composition and cells.

  • Healthy hydration resources
    • Cucumber
    • Low-fat Milk
    • Soups
    • Low-sugar sports drinks
    • Strawberries
    • Water
    • Watermelon

Micronutrients

Minerals and Vitamins
  • Eating a balanced meal keeps the body functioning normally and healthy with the help of vitamins and minerals.

  • Healthy Resources
    • Beans
    • Dairy
    • Fruits
    • Peas
    • Peanuts
    • Seeds
    • Vegetables
    • Whole grains
      • cereal
      • bread

Learning to have a healthy diet is knowledge everyone in recovery should have. Recovery is treating the body, mind, and spirit. The body can be treated by eating healthy and replenishing a body that was once afflicted with addiction.

The answer to recovery is Simple. Simple Recovery has a passion for transforming lives through residential, intensive outpatient, and outpatient programs. Built on action, our treatment plan encourages movement in life, bringing clients back to work, back to school, or involvement with meaningful volunteer work. For information on our addiction treatment and dual diagnosis programs for men and women, call: 877-312-7440

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